Youth Juice - Scam or legit

This is a discussion on Youth Juice - Scam or legit within the Money Frauds and Scams forum, part of the OTHER TOPICS OF INTEREST category; Originally Posted by Unregistered Troll, troll, troll, troll, troll... ROFL! Uh dumbass... look up. This is a forum to discuss ...

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Old Feb 21st, 2010, 06:40 PM   #281
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Default Re: Youth Juice - Scam or legit

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
Troll, troll, troll, troll, troll... ROFL!
Uh dumbass... look up. This is a forum to discuss scams not an MLM "opportunity" forum. That makes YOU the troll here. LMAO
 
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Old Feb 21st, 2010, 07:21 PM   #282
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Default Re: Youth Juice - Scam or legit

Begone Troll! Your flaming powers no longer work here.

(At the risk of stroking your ego even further) What I write, I write for the benefit of anyone who has come here looking for FACTS about what Youth Juice is, and what the real opportunities attached to this incredible product are.

I know better than to even try to convince you of anything, since you clearly know everything anyway.

If you don't want to drink Youth Juice? Don't.

If you don't want to make some extra money sharing a great product with people, and helping your friends and family become healthier? Don't.

Don't want to get wealthy AND get healthy? Don't.

Don't want to drive a Ford, because you like Chevy better? Well then don't.

Don't want to wear anything but pink Underoos to a formal dinner party? Don't!

Listen, I respect your right to be wrong, and no one should ever try to convince you of anything, except perhaps when your misguided beliefs represent a direct and distinct threat to others (yours are simply amusing).

Everyone should, and more importantly has the right to, make an informed decision, and should do their own careful and proper due diligence before becoming involved in anything.

There is no question each and every one of the ingredients in Youth Juice have been carefully and considerably researched and proven to work. I seem to recall you even agreeing to as much in a previous post?

Like with any market consumable, sure, there are some questionable products available, some downright bad ones, some good ones even, and in the functional food market, there is ONE exceptional product, and Youth Juice is it.

Why? Because it's backed by science. Lots and lots of science. I've seen it for myself. But don't take my word (or anyone else's) for it, do your own research.

Don't like the checkthescience.com report just because you can't trace back the domain registrar? Don't use it. There are hundreds, if not thousands, of sites that will back up the science that goes into every single bottle of Youth Juice. Try PubMed >> PubMed home

Also, there is also no question the MLM business model works. Just ask Amway Global, Avon, Herbalife, Mary Kay Cosmetics, Pampered Chef, to name a few, but ALL billion dollar organizations that have been operating for multiple years, some for decades. Perhaps you have heard of some of these companies?

Does everyone who gets involved become wealthy? No, of course not, but that also doesn't mean some people ARE actually able to retire and live out their dreams because they were offered the opportunity to do so, and did what needed doing to get to where they wanted to be. And each and every person who gets involved with Our World Network, and Youth Juice, is offered exactly the same opportunity.

So to say the business model is flawed is nonsense. To any clear thinking person it's completely legitimate, and completely legal. In fact, the MLM industry is a lot more tightly regulated and monitored than most others.

“wellness is the industry in which the fortunes of the new millennium will be created and distribution will be where most of that wealth occurs.” Paul Zane Pilzer

Don't know who Paul Zane Pilzer is? Google him. Find out not only what he has to say about the marriage of the booming health & wellness market with direct marketing (MLM). Find out why you should care about his opinion.

Or don't, but seriously, don't just take someone else's word for it (myself included), simply because it's easier to listen to some uninformed opinions on the internet, than it is actually do your own research and due diligence.

Clearly, to any intelligent and thinking person, you have an axe to grind and your own personal agenda (as do we all), and you know what? You have that right, and I honestly don't even care what it is. You go girl!

And I will even defend to the death, your right to spew your baseless rhetoric, for anyone dumb enough to listen to your unsubstantiated, and unproven, or unconfirmed "facts" (because that's their right too, and it's called natural selection).

The real fact is, in this country and many others, you are innocent until PROVEN guilty, and you have yet to provide a single shred of proof to back up what you say, and despite being offered multiple examples and sources of proof about the claims of Youth Juice, Our World Network, and MLM as a valid business model, you continually choose to ignore all this evidence, offer your own nonsensical opinions, and continue to flame this forum. Pathetic really, but it is your right to do so.

But that's the beauty thing about the internet. Any idiot with an opinion, no matter how mis-informed, can claim to be an expert on anything.

Seriously though, and I am not sorry to burst your bubble (if that's even possible), none of your arguments hold any water here, nor would they in a court of law.

So I say again, begone Troll. Or don't! ;-)

Not that I am actually expecting you to go away. Certainly your antics are amusing, and I am actually looking forward to yet another of your inflammatory and off-topic responses. Now it is your turn to dance for us, monkey-boy!

Dance away little monkey!
 
Old Feb 21st, 2010, 07:46 PM   #283
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Default Re: Youth Juice - Scam or legit

Since you are so obviously misinformed about the whole Fund America fiasco, which was the brainchild of Bob Edwards (the founder and owner of Our World Network, and maker of Youth Juice), here is what Wikipedia has to say about the matter:

(Yeah I know it's only Wiki, but at least I am providing my sources)

FundAmerica - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

FundAmerica, Inc. was a discount buying club that marketed consumer buying club memberships through multi-level marketing. The business began in 1987 in Los Angeles, California before moving its offices to Irvine, California. FundAmerica eventually became defunct following pyramid scheme allegations, bankruptcy, and a reemergence as FundAmerica 2000, Inc.

Contents

* 1 Membership
* 2 Service providers
* 3 Marketing plan
* 4 The Business
* 5 Accusations of a pyramid scheme proved false
* 6 Conclusion
* 7 Additional Facts
* 8 References


Membership

The cost of an individual FundAmerica membership was a $100.00 a year with an additional $40.00 administrative fee (first year only). With membership a member would receive a blue mid-size three ring binder with information and forms to fill out. The premise of the membership through FundAmerica were to get members to save monies through rebates and have those rebates automatically transferred to a tax-deferred annuity bearing compounding interest. FundAmerica wanted to get their members to save while spending through the membership.


Service providers

There were several service providers that offered rebates and/or discounts with a retail FundAmerica membership. Some of the providers with an individual retail membership was savings on long distance through MCI Communications with a 20% rebate, a 5% travel rebate with Ask Mr. Foster Travel Agency, a 10% rebate from the Best Products catalog, and a small rebate through the MBNA America Bank credit card purchases. Additionally, there was a preclipped coupon program where a FundAmerica member would check which items he or she wanted and then the company would send them clipped coupons through the mail. And, there was an accelerated mortgage program to save thousands of dollars on one’s home, through paying bi-weekly rather than monthly payments. Also, there was a $99.00 short notice resort condo program, where through membership, one would call one week prior and reserve an unfilled condo at a resort. The members' rebate monies would be transferred to individual tax-deferred annuity accounts bearing compounding interest.


Marketing plan

A FundAmerica Independent Representative could buy into the marketing structure at $400.00 as an Associate (with five wholesale memberships), $1,600.00 as a Manager (with twenty wholesale memberships), or $3200.00 as a Director (with forty wholesale memberships). The next earned level was Executive Director with ten Directors directly underneath him then Presidential Director with ten Executive Directors directly below in the marketing plan. It was the marketing plan that qualified FundAmerica, Inc. as a legal company according to the laws of California. An Independent Representative could "downline" up to twenty wholesale memberships to a new representative making him a Manager, and that new Manager could, in turn, "downline" as many as twenty memberships wholesale to new representatives joining the marketing plan.


The Business

For the annual cost of $100, Members received their FundAmerica Membership and their monthly savings were automatically tracked and reported to them in their Member’s Quarterly Magazine. This state-of-the-art, customized, printed magazine — the first of its kind ever to be produced by any organization in the United States — included a personalized statement, much like a monthly credit card statement, detailing Members’ monthly purchases through FundAmerica service providers and the attendant ‘rebate’ of discounted pricing. benefits as an individual Member began being demonstrated — in many cases, worth well beyond the annual cost of membership — FundAmerica achieved critical mass, and professionals from all walks of life began associating with the organization. With FundAmerica’s commitment to proper sales procedures, highquality service and uncompromising accuracy of Member purchase activity — demonstrated by the fact that the company refused to open more than one state at a time — financial and business sector leaders recognized the validity of the Membership. Certified public accountants, financial planners and mortgage bankers began offering Memberships to their clients and applauded the ‘forced savings accounts’ which they viewed as the quarterly Member rebate disbursements into retirement annuities. Real estate agents were giving away an annual Membership to their new homebuyers, and celebrities began inquiring as to how they might become involved. Arthur Laffer, noted supply-side economist and an economic adviser to former President Ronald Reagan, joined FundAmerica as a Member. After utilizing his Membership for several months, he was so impressed with the benefits and rewards of being a Member that he became a Member of the Board of Directors and appeared in a FundAmerica promotional videotape in which he spoke about the benefits and timeliness of participation in FundAmerica. A full twenty years before a young entrepreneur named Jeff Bezos decided that people would rather purchase their reading materials online than visit their local book store, FundAmerica began assembling consumers together in a virtual world without the aid of the Internet. Bezos, like Edwards, knew that profits would eventually come if the services and product offerings were first-class, and yet, they both understood that the first four to five years of a revolutionary concept would mean hard work building the solid foundation, and re-investing revenue streams in forging a loyal customer base and excellent relationships with providers. Additionally, behind the scenes, and in an attempt to mirror the success FundAmerica was establishing with its new, integrated digital network, the framework for the Discover Card was formed in 1987 by the Sears Financial Network. In time, this unique credit card would compete with the FundAmerica MasterCard program and be a direct rival to the VISA and MasterCard franchises worldwide.

These rebates were automatically calculated by the service and product providers and transferred directly into a Member Trust Account — the receipts and accounting of this Member Trust Account were audited by certified public accountants each and every month to verify the accuracy and safety of these Member-owned funds. Members then had the option, every quarter, of receiving their rebates, once they had reached $250 or more, either in the form of a check or as an individual Retirement Annuity from one of the nation’s oldest insurance companies, Mutual Benefit Life Insurance Company. When Mutual Benefit Life was sold, annuities were transferred to Lincoln Benefit Life, another well-established institution and a Member of the Allstate Financial Group. Sales of the annual Membership through Independent FundAmerica distributors soared, and Member purchases through the Membership skyrocketed as individuals realized the world of savings that was available to them through this unique and financially-rewarding concept. With Fortune 100 service providers regularly verifying the consistently growing group purchases of FundAmerica Members, other mainstream organizations wanted to become involved in this remarkable ‘virtual store concept’. Basically what Saul Price of Price Club had made so successful with his brick and mortar super-stores throughout the Western United States, FundAmerica was doing with a Membership card, buying clout and a sophisticated software tracking system. Retailers and financial institutions began to take notice, and it was then that FundAmerica and MBNA America, the country’s largest affinity card provider, reached an agreement to provide qualifying FundAmerica Members with a FundAmerica MasterCard. Now, with the sophistication of FundAmerica’s back-office tracking software and integrated Trust Account audit streams, Members would soon have access to a much broader world of savings as FundAmerica negotiated additional group buying agreements with other national chains, institutions and product and service organizations. Within the first 120 days of its release, FundAmerica became MBNA America’s fastest-growing affinity group, outpacing new member signups of such organizations as the American Automobile Association and Ducks Unlimited. Indeed, the sky appeared to be the limit. Even though FundAmerica was only operating in the states of California, Arizona, Colorado, Oregon, Texas, Utah, Washington, and Florida, it began attracting major attention. As word of the income opportunity as an Independent Distributor marketing Memberships to individuals and local and national groups grew, as well as the tremendous savings

Realizing the incredible promotional benefits of an integrated member savings portfolio, VISA, MasterCard and Discover Card launched their own versions of the rebate programs, offering tiny percentages to cardholders on their purchases. This revolutionary concept was now adopted by leading financial institutions around the world.


Accusations of a pyramid scheme proved false

Unfortunately for FundAmerica and its nearly 200,000 Members in eight states, and tens of thousands of Independent Distributors who relied upon this financial powerhouse for their monthly incomes, in July 1990 a political crisis was brewing for a certain Florida Comptroller who was desperately seeking public attention during a very difficult bid for reelection.

Without requesting financial information or a personal meeting to discuss FundAmerica’s solid network marketing program, or its Member Services Portfolio and Trust Account with FundAmerica executives, Florida Comptroller Gerald Lewis issued a cease and desist order for FundAmerica. He also successfully encouraged Statewide Prosecutor Peter Antonacci to file charges of organized fraud, securities fraud and running an illegal lottery against Robert Edwards and FundAmerica in Florida’s 9th Circuit Court in Orlando on July 19, 1990.

The lagging public support of an elected official in Florida was immediately buoyed by the headlines generated in his state regarding the erroneous criminal action taken against Edwards and FundAmerica as well as Edwards’ highly-publicized arrest. Immediately released on bail, Edwards and his team began the difficult task of defending the company and its Membership in the press. In the ensuing frenzy, the local California and Florida newspapers began a tabloid-style attack, printing headlines and stories which contained very few facts and wild speculations. Staff writers, who were more accustomed to writing travel features and fashion recaps, and publishing books on mountain climbing, were now asked to report on a very complex financial institution. And attorneys, seeing huge legal fees, began rounding up Independent Distributors to file a Class Action Lawsuit without merit. Nervous Florida prosecutors clamoring for action, yet with no solid evidence to support their charges, persuaded a federal judge to order FundAmerica’s assets frozen, preventing it from paying any sales commissions to its Independent Distributors. In essence, this illadvised action shut down the day-to-day operations of FundAmerica. With the created uncertainty between what Edwards and FundAmerica had clearly demonstrated as a sound and solid, financially-sustainable and legal operation, and the outrageous stories being printed by the media, FundAmerica service providers, wary of having their names splashed across the tabloids, suspended their future associations with the company, yet continued to honor the Master Agreement which guaranteed Member discounts through participating providers.

FundAmerica, Inc. was shut down through a cease-and-desist order by the Florida Attorney General's Office and Florida Banking & Finance Department on July 21, 1990. Florida was the only state that deemed FundAmerica an illegal pyramid. FundAmerica reopened in various states most specifically California and even new markets such as Chicago and Illinois. Bob Edwards spent the next 4 years and over $30M trying to rebuild FundAmerica but was not successful.


Conclusion

On one hand, the retail FundAmerica membership was a sound idea saving for a future retirement - saving while spending, however on the other, the marketing plan with its "wholesale buy-in" and "downlining" created problems with the state of Florida. It was the state of Florida that put an end to this so-called "business opportunity of a lifetime." FundAmerica, Inc. had almost reached what people in the multi-level marketing field call critical mass, despite only operating in California, Arizona, Colorado, Oregon, Texas, Utah, Washington, and Florida. Critical mass is when an mlm company is poised for geometric growth exponentially. According to Florida officials[who?] some 98% of more than $33 million in gross income (during the first four months of 1990) came from "wholesale membership sales."

Over the course of several months, FundAmerica was vindicated as a legitimate, timely and revolutionary membership savings program and network marketing opportunity. The State of Florida, having dropped all charges against Edwards and FundAmerica, ended up citing FundAmerica for not having a valid business license in the State of Florida, fined the company $25,000, and prohibited the company from doing business within the State of Florida for twelve months. Edwards and FundAmerica subsequently were able to release the nearly $4 Million in withheld commissions to Independent Distributors. FundAmerica Member rebates, always fully-funded and held in a Member Trust Account were disbursed in accordance with the provisions of the FundAmerica Membership. Attempts to revitalize the FundAmerica program under the name of FundAmerica 2000, including Edwards’ additional, personal investment of nearly $20 Million, ultimately failed. The damage to the company, its Independent Distributors and its Members by overzealous Florida officials and the sensation-hungry media was simply too great for Independent Distributors to overcome.


Additional Facts

As a matter of public record, by mid-October 1990, in just under 90 days of the State of Florida’s erroneous actions and baseless charges, a federal bankruptcy judge refused to order the removal of the beleaguered company’s current management. “There has been a lack of proof to sustain the appointment of a trustee at this stage of the case,” said U.S. Bankruptcy Judge James N. Barr in Santa Ana. “I have no indications that current management is doing anything illegal or anything that is to the detriment of the estate.” Additionally, Florida was the only state to file criminal charges against the company, and California Attorney General John Van de Kamp stepped forward to assure citizens of his state that he “found that FundAmerica’s business model and membership did not violate any state law.”

And, ironically, the Florida comptroller who was responsible for the false charges being brought against the company and Edwards, would be disgraced in 2003 through an impeachment resolution for accepting campaign cash to overlook problems at failing Florida financial institutions under his direct oversight.

References

* VanDruff, Dean. "What's Wrong With Multi-Level Marketing? - III". Quixtar. Quixtar Blog: What's Wrong With Multi-Level Marketing? - III.
* Wichner, David (1990-07-23) (Final ed.). The Phoenix Gazzette. Record Number 9007260151
* Pender, Kathleen (1990-08-01) (Final Chaser ed.). San Francisco Chronicle. Section: Business; Record Number 9008060184
* Rechtin, Mark (1990-07-30). Orange County Business Journal.


----------------------------------------------------

There are a couple of interesting key points in here, but I am willing to give you the benefit of the doubt, and let you read it for yourself, and see if you can spot where you are CLEARLY WRONG (or misinformed) in your assumptions about Bob Edwards (the founder and owner of Our World Network, and maker of Youth Juice).

Don't worry, I don't expect any apology or public admission, or anything like that (and I'm sure Bob wouldn't either).

I've never met him, but I would sure like to. He sounds like a smart man, and an unselfish one. He is (IMHO) a visionary, and I would be proud to be in business with him, or associate myself with his businesses.

But he also is a man who has been given a raw deal, unjustly persecuted, and who continues to be harassed and belittled by narrow minded and selfish people (like yourself).

One thing I will say, is that if Bob Edwards could build a business from scratch to over 200,000 members in 8 states, in ONLY 3 years, firstly, I would gladly get into business with someone like that, but also, I would hope someone like that might not make the same mistakes twice.

Keep trolling though, monkey-boy. I'm sure there must be someone out there reading your tripe, and who is gullible enough to swallow it.
 
Old Feb 21st, 2010, 07:55 PM   #284
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Default Re: Youth Juice - Scam or legit

Since you asked, here are just a few (well 50 actually) credible sources of PROOF of the effectiveness, and healthy benefits of the ingredients of Youth Juice:
References

1. Davies K: Oxidative stress: the paradox of aerobic life. Biochemical Society Symposia 1995. 61: 1-31.

2. Sies H: Oxidative stress; oxidants and antioxidants. Experimental Physiology 1997. 82: 291-295

3. Harman D: Aging, a theory based on free radical and radiation chemistry. Journal of Gerontology 1956; 11 (3): 298-300.

4. Mecocci P, Polidori MC, Troyano L Cherubini A, Cecchetti R, Pini G, Straatman M, Monti D, Stahl W, SiesH, Franceschi C, Senin U: Plasma antioxidants and longevity: a study on healthy centenarians. Free Radical Biology & Medicine 2000. 28 (8): 1243-1248.

5. Ames BN, Shigenaga MK, Hagen TM: Oxidants, antioxidants, and the degenerative diseases of aging. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 1993. 90: 7915-7922.

6. Stanner SA, Hughes J, Kelly CN, Buttriss J: A review of the epidemiological evidence for the antioxidant hypothesis. Public Health Nutrition 2004. 7 (3): 407-422

7. Wang J, Wen L, Huang Y, Chen Y, Ku M: Dual effects of antioxidants in neurodegeneration; direct neuroprotection against oxidative stress and indirect protection via suppression of glia-mediated inflammation. Current Pharmaceutical Design 2006. 12 (27): 3521-3533

8. Cherubini A, Vigna G, Zuliani G, Ruggiero C, Senin U, Fellin R: Role of antioxidants in atherosclerosis; epidemiological and clinical update. Current Pharmaceutical Design 2005. 11 (16): 2017-2032

9. Lotito SB, Frei B: Consumption of flavonoid-rich foods and increased plasma antioxidant capacity in humans; cause, consequence, or epiphenomenon. Free Radical Biology & Medicine 2006. 41 (12): 1727-1746

10. Sies H: Oxidative stress: From basic research to clinical application. The American Journal of Medicine 1991. 91 (3): S31-S38

11. Vertuani S, Angusti A, Manfredini S: The antioxidants and pro-antioxidants network; an overview. Current Pharmaceutical Design 2004. 10 (14): 1677-1694

12. Chaudiere J, Ferrari-Illiou R: Intracellular antioxidants; from chemical to biochemical mechanisms. Food and Chemical Toxicology 1999. 37 (9-10): 949-962

13. Cao G, Alessio HM, Cutler RG: Oxygen-radical absorbance capacity assay for antioxidants. Free Radical Biology & Medicine 1993; Vol 14: 303-311.

14. Nutrient Data Laboratory, Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center, Agriculture Research Service, US Department of Agriculture: Oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) of selected foods. Online Report USDA 2007: Nutrient Data : Home

15. Cao G, Booth SL, Sadowski JA, Prior RL: Increases in human plasma antioxidant capacity after consumption of controlled diets high in fruit and vegetables. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 1998. 68 (5): 1081-1087

16. McBride J: Can Foods Forestall Aging? Agricultural Research Feb 2007: Can Foods Forestall Aging?

17. International Life Science Institute: Home Page

18. Ross HA, McDougall GJ, Steward D: Antiproliferative activity is prominently associated with ellagitannins in raspberry extracts. Phytochemistry 2007. 68 (2) 218-228

19. Vattem DA, Shetty K: Biological function of ellagic acid: a review. Journal of Biological Food Chemistry 2005. 29: 234Â266.

20. Gordillo G, Fang H, Khanna S, Harper J, Phillips G, Sen CK: Oral administration of blueberry inhibits angiogenic tumor growth and enhances survival of mice with endothelial cell neoplasm. Antioxidants Redox Signaling 2009. 11 (1): 47-58

21. Duffy KB, Spangler EL, Devan BD, Devan BD, Guo Z, Bowker JL, Janas AM, Hagepanos A, Minor RK, DeCabo R, Mouton PR, Shukitt-Hale B, Joseph JA, Ingram DK: A blueberry-enriched diet provides cellular protection against oxidative stress and reduces a kainate-induced learning impairment in rats. Neurobiology of Aging 2008. 29 (11): 1680-1689

22. Jospeh JA, Shukitt-Hale B, Lau FC: Fruit polyphenols and their effects on neuronal signaling and behavior in senescence. Annuals of the NY Academy of Sciences 2007. 1100: 470-485

23. Shukitt-Hale B, Lau FC, Jospeh JA: Berry fruit supplementation and the aging brain. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 2008. 56 (3): 636-641

24. Joseph JA, Denisova NA, Arendash G, Gordon M, Shukitt-Hale B, Morgan D: Blueberry supplementation enhances signaling and prevents behavorial deficits in an Alzheimer disease model. Nutritional Neuroscience 2003. 6 (3): 153-162 Alzheimer

25. Ahmet I, Spangler E, Shukitt-Hal B, Joseph J, Ingram D, Talan M: Blueberry-Enriched Diet Protects Heart from Ischemic Damage. Journal of Cardiac Failure 2007. 13 (6), S79

26. Russell WR, Labat A, Scobbie L, Duncan SH: Availability of blueberry phenolics for microbial metabolism in the colon and the potential inflammatory implications. Molecular Nutrition & Food Research 2007. 51 (6): 726-731

27. Devareddy L, Hooshmand S, Collins JK, Lucas EA, Chai SC, Arjmandi BH: Blueberry prevents bone loss in ovariectomized rat model of postmenopausal osteoporosis. J Nutritional Biochemistry 2008. 19 (10): 694-699

28. Kalt W, Foote K, Fillmore SA, Lyon M, Van Lunen TA, McRae KB: Effect on blueberry feeding on plasma lipids in pigs. British Journal of Nutrition 2008. 100 (1): 70-78

29. Vuong T, Martineau LC, Ramassamy C, Matar C, Haddad PS. Fermented Canadian lowbush blueberry juice stimulates glucose uptake and AMP-activated protein kinase in insulin-sensitive cultured muscle cells and adipocytes. Canadian Journal of Physiology And Pharmacology 2007. 85 (9): 956-965

30. Neto CC: Cranberry and blueberry; evidence for protective effects against cancer and vascular diseases. Molecular Nutrition & Food Research 2007. 51 (6): 652-664

31. Bickford PC, Tan J, Shytle RD, Sanberg CD, El-Badri N, Sanberg PR: Nutraceuticals synergistically promote proliferation of human stem cells. Stem Cells And Development 2006. 15 (1): 118-123.

32. Shukitt-Hale B, Carey AN, Jenkins D, Rabin BM, Joseph JA: Beneficial effects of fruit extracts on neural function and behavior in a rodent model of accelerated aging. Neurobiology Of Aging 2007. 28 (8): 1187-1194

33. Anon: Cranberry juice for prophylaxis of urinary tract infections  conclusions rom clinical experience and research. Phytomedicine 2008. 15 (9): 653-667

34. Neto CC: Cranberry and its phytochemicals; a review of in-vitro anticancer studies. Journal Of Nutrition 2007. 137 (1S): 186S-193S

35. Zakay-Rones Z, Varsano N, Zlotnik M, Manor O, Regev L, Schlesinger M, Mumcuoglu M: Inhibition of several strains of influenza virus in vitro and reduction of symptoms by an elderberry extract (Sambucus nigra L) during an outbreak of influenza B Panama. Journal of Alternative And Complementary Medicine 1995. 1 (4): 361-369

36. Bell DR, Gochenaur K: Direct vasoactive and vasoprotective properties of anthocyanin-rich extracts. Journal Of Applied Physiology 2006. 100 (4): 1164-1170

37. Seeram NP, Adams LS, Zhang Y, Lee R, Sand D, Scheuller HS, Heber D: Blackberry, black raspberry, blueberry, cranberry, red raspberry, and strawberry extracts inhibit growth and stimulate apoptosis of human cancer cells in vitro. Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry 2006. 54 (25): 9323-9339

38. Marniemi J, Hakala P, Maki J, Ahotupa M: Partial resistance of low density lipoprotein to oxidation in vivo after increased intake of berries. Nutrition, Metabolism, And Cardiovascular Disease 2000. 10 (6): 331-337

39. Nakaishi H, Matsumoto H, Tominaga S, Hirayama M,: Effects of black current anthocyanoside intake on dark adaptation and VDT work-induced transient refractive alterations in healthy humans. Alternative Medicine Review 2000. 5 (6): 553-562

40. Cavanagh HM, Hipwell M, Wilkinson JM: Antibacterial activity of berry fruits used for culinary purposes. Journal of Medicinal Food 2003. 6 (1): 57-61

41.PubMed home

42. Haneji K, Matsuda T, Tomita M, Kawakami H, Ohsiro K, Uchihara JN, Masuda M, Takasu N, Tanaka Y, Ohta T, Mori N: Fucoidan extracted from cladosiphon okamuranus tokida induces apoptosis of human T-cll leucemia virus type 1-infected T-cell lines and primary adult T-cell leukemia cells. Nutrition And Cancer 2005. 52 (2): 189-201

43. Liu JM, Bignon J, Haroun-Bouhedja F, Bittoun P, Vassy J, Fermandjian S, Wdzieczak-Bakala J, Boisson-Vidal C: Inhibitory effect of fucoidan on the adhesion of adenocarcinoma cells to fibronectin. Anticancer Research 2005. 25 (3B): 2129-2133

44. Itoh H, Noda H, Amano H, Zhuaug C, Mizuno T, Ito H: Antitumor activity and immunological properties of marine algae polysaccarides, especially fucoidan, prepared from sargassum thunbergii of phaeophyceae. Anticancer Research 1993. 13 (6A): 2045-2052

45. Lamela M, Anca J, Villar R, Otero J, Calleja JM: Hypoglycemic activity of several seaweed extracts. Journal of Ethnopharmacology 1989. 27(1-2): 35-43

46. Le Tutour B, Benslimane F, Gouleau MP, Gouygou JP, Saadan B, Quemeneur F: Anti-oxidant and pro-oxidant activities of the brown algae, laminaria digitata, himanthalia elongate, focus vesiculosus, focus serratus and ascophyllum nodosum. Journal Of Applied Phycology 1998. 10 (2): 121-129

47. Mourao PA: Use of sulfated fucans as anticoagulant and antithrombotic agents; future perspectives. Current Pharmaceutical Design 2004. 10 (9): 967-981

48. Witvrouw M, Clercq E: Sulfated polysaccharides extracted from sea algae as potential antiviral drugs. General Pharmacology 1997. 29 (4): 497-511

49. Fujimura T, Tsukahara K, Moriwaki S, Kitahara T, Sano T, Takema Y: Treatment of human skin with an extract of Fucus vesiculosus changes its thickness and mechanical properties. Journal Of Cosmetic Science 2002. 53 (1):1-9

50. Davis TA, Volesky B, Mucci A: A review of the biochemistry of heavy metal biosorption by brown algae. Water Research 2003. 37 ( 18): 4311-4330


It's credible research and information like the ones cited above, which is causing doctor's (whose job it is to know health and wellness) to join the YJ revolution.

Do you have any credible sources of PROOF to back up your claims that Youth Juice is NOT what it claims to be? (Didn't think so!)
 
Old Feb 21st, 2010, 08:37 PM   #285
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Youth Juice was developed in cooperation with a Canadian Government Research and Development Grant.

Youth Juice is a drink made of 100% pure organic berries and sea vegetables.

It is the perfect mixture of land and sea as it contains seven important antioxidant-loaded and cancer-fighting berries (raspberries, blueberries, blackberries, black elderberries, blackcurrant berries, boysenberries, and cranberries) as well as 3 immune-enhancing and detoxifying sea vegetables (fucoidan, rockweed, and ulva).

A science-based, cold-pressed, patent-pending extraction process guarantees that nutrient values, freshness, and flavor are preserved.

Youth Juice currently yields the highest ORAC value of any product on the market (12,350 per serving). In the world of antiaging medicine highest ORAC translates to highest antiaging effects.

Youth Juice is manufactured following the stringent industry standards called Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP), These standards assure the superior quality and safety of the juice.

Antiaging physicians classify Youth Juice as the top antiaging functional food product currently available.

It is truly Science in a Bottle.

An independent scientific report on the Youth Juice can be obtained at checkthescience.com.
 
Old Feb 21st, 2010, 09:25 PM   #286
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Youth Juice was developed in cooperation with a Canadian Government Research and Development Grant.
No, it wasn't. The report that they reference all the time was what was developed in cooperation with the Canadian agriculture dept. It wasn't done by YJ and it's not specific to YJ, it's just a broad survey of research to support the Canadian berry industry


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Youth Juice is a drink made of 100% pure organic berries and sea vegetables.
They had to drop the organic label since they can't meet labelling requirements for it to be called organic.

Also, if you want to get technical about it even according to their own label it's not "100% pure berries and sea vegetables" since there is added fructose and potassium sorbate. Also likely water added as well given the preparation requirements for various ingredients.

Furthermore, it's a little difficult to understand how all of the ingredients from natural sources as they describe all just happen to add to 100% of the RDA for every nutrient listed. You'd be hard pressed to find that on any "natural" product that hasn't been suplemented in some way to hit specific targeted measures.

Unfortunately, there's no actual certification of contents or sources so you really can't be sure.


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It is the perfect mixture of land and sea as it contains seven important antioxidant-loaded and cancer-fighting berries (raspberries, blueberries, blackberries, black elderberries, blackcurrant berries, boysenberries, and cranberries) as well as 3 immune-enhancing and detoxifying sea vegetables (fucoidan, rockweed, and ulva).

A science-based, cold-pressed, patent-pending extraction process guarantees that nutrient values, freshness, and flavor are preserved.
Given that virtually all of the key active compounds that they cite as benefits are found in the skin and seeds of the berries, doesn't really help much.


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Youth Juice currently yields the highest ORAC value of any product on the market (12,350 per serving). In the world of antiaging medicine highest ORAC translates to highest antiaging effects.
Again, no certification or independent analysis to demonstrate this. Also, if you look at how some products calculate the ORAC value it's by simply adding a generic best case for each component together to reach an aggregate number. Not really a valid measure. Not sure how YJ does it since the origin of the number is not disclosed any place that I've found.


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Youth Juice is manufactured following the stringent industry standards called Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP), These standards assure the superior quality and safety of the juice.
Nothing special. All consumer food products are prepared in accordance with the same standards. This basically represents a commercial kitchen that meets sanitation and food safety requirements.


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Antiaging physicians classify Youth Juice as the top antiaging functional food product currently available.

It is truly Science in a Bottle.

An independent scientific report on the Youth Juice can be obtained at checkthescience.com.
Once again, the checkthescience site is not independent and the business relationship between it and YJ is not properly disclosed.
 
Old Feb 22nd, 2010, 01:32 AM   #287
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Don't like the checkthescience.com report just because you can't trace back the domain registrar? Don't use it. There are hundreds, if not thousands, of sites that will back up the science that goes into every single bottle of Youth Juice. Try PubMed >>
No, I don't like the checkthescience site because it is misleadingly represented as an independent site when it very clearly is not and business relationships between it and YJ are not properly disclosed.


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Also, there is also no question the MLM business model works. Just ask Amway Global, Avon, Herbalife, Mary Kay Cosmetics, Pampered Chef, to name a few, but ALL billion dollar organizations that have been operating for multiple years, some for decades. Perhaps you have heard of some of these companies?

Does everyone who gets involved become wealthy? No, of course not, but that also doesn't mean some people ARE actually able to retire and live out their dreams because they were offered the opportunity to do so, and did what needed doing to get to where they wanted to be. And each and every person who gets involved with Our World Network, and Youth Juice, is offered exactly the same opportunity.

So to say the business model is flawed is nonsense. To any clear thinking person it's completely legitimate, and completely legal. In fact, the MLM industry is a lot more tightly regulated and monitored than most others.
We've already been through this many times. Look back. Yes, the MLM model works for the companies. They make lots of money on the backs of suckers who belive that they're going to make money in such ventures. Unfortunately, the facts say that virtually none will, most won't make back their initial investment, and most even "successful" participants lose money. Everyone is not presented the same opportunity because the pyramid grows top down and due to saturation later participants are at a distinct disadvantage.


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Don't know who Paul Zane Pilzer is? Google him. Find out not only what he has to say about the marriage of the booming health & wellness market with direct marketing (MLM). Find out why you should care about his opinion.
Again, we've been through the Pilzer thing. Yes, he's also very good at making money selling dreams to chumps like you. Let me know when he actually JOINS one of the programs that he promotes versus just selling his stuff to the participants and then your argument might have some weight. Until then, it just further supports mine.

The rest of your post merits no response.
 
Old Feb 22nd, 2010, 01:52 AM   #288
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Since you asked, here are just a few (well 50 actually) credible sources of PROOF of the effectiveness, and healthy benefits of the ingredients of Youth Juice:
References

1. Davies K: Oxidative stress: the paradox of aerobic life. Biochemical Society Symposia 1995. 61: 1-31.

2. Sies H: Oxidative stress; oxidants and antioxidants. Experimental Physiology 1997. 82: 291-295

3. Harman D: Aging, a theory based on free radical and radiation chemistry. Journal of Gerontology 1956; 11 (3): 298-300..........
All of which are very generic studies related to various aspects of anti-oxidants and other subjects related to various specific ingredients that are similar to those used in YJ, not to YJ itself. If you'd actually read some of the studies instead of simply copying the lists to make it look impressive, you'll note that they are very careful about exactly what compounds, methods of extraction and testing, cell types used, and a host of other very specific aspects are employed in the studies. Anyone with even a basic understanding of how such things work will understand that much if not most of this is not directly transferable in any valid way to claims made for YJ itself.

But even that being the case, I really don't have much of a problem with anyone saying that YJ contains stuff that's good for you. It's expensive but hey if it turns your crank, then drink up. My issues are more with the many misleading claims made and regarding the business "opportunity." Beyond that, you guys just keep saying dumb things that are easy to pick apart. LOL
 
Old Feb 22nd, 2010, 02:32 AM   #289
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Since you are so obviously misinformed about the whole Fund America fiasco, which was the brainchild of Bob Edwards (the founder and owner of Our World Network, and maker of Youth Juice), here is what Wikipedia has to say about the matter:

(Yeah I know it's only Wiki, but at least I am providing my sources)....
Once again you guys continue to have a problem with that "independent" thing. The Wikipedia article very clearly was written by someone with a "pro" slant and it omits some key information. A better reference than the slanted history that's very common to Wikipedia are the original reports from the time, many of which present a somewhat different picture than that painted by the Wiki. If you really want to get into it then I could call out some specific points but for now I'll just again recommend that anyone interested take the time to search back and read actual independent reports of events and judge for themselves.
 
Old Feb 24th, 2010, 10:20 AM   #290
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Most of the nay sayers here are not giving the product a chance purely because of its network marketing. Anyone here remember xanga juice? there was stuff all over the internet on how big of a scam it was and that it didnt do anything for you. Well i beg to differ, my grandparents were told by their DR to try it out and they noticed a big difference in their quality of life. I have been on the youth juice for a while now and i can say that i got through the cold and flu season without a single symptom while i watch people around me every day getting sick and feeling miserable. I am also an athlete so i put my body through alot of pyshical strain and it helps me bounce back. All i have to say is to all the nay sayers is dont knock it til you try it. I can almost guarentee you that they are basing their decision solely on the networking side of it and not even looking at the product for what it is. No one ever said that you couldnt get the individual product at the grocery store, you can. Its just more convienent to drink a small bit of juice every day then eating all the berries you would have to to get the same effect. Isnt that what the world has come to now a days is to have everything simplified.
 
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