Certified mail... If I do not sign for it from an attorney

This is a discussion on Certified mail... If I do not sign for it from an attorney within the Civil Litigation forum, part of the ATTORNEYS, COURTS, LITIGATION category; Originally Posted by Unregistered I see and like I said try it when your next jury summons come and see ...

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Old Feb 4th, 2010, 11:43 PM   #11
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Default re: Certified mail... If I do not sign for it from an attorney

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I see and like I said try it when your next jury summons come and see if the sherriff isnt knocking on your door.
Don't the courts send jury summons by regular mail?
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Old Feb 21st, 2010, 12:21 AM   #12
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I think not signing for mail is like an admission of guilt.
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Old Feb 22nd, 2010, 01:04 PM   #13
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Default Re: Certified mail... If I do not sign for it from an attorney

Not sure what the last post meant exactly, but a person is under no obligation to sign for a certified letter, regardless of who it is from. There is no law currently in existence that requires a recipient of a certified letter to sign for it. After three attempts, the mail is returned, unsigned for.

No certified mail would contain any type of court documents anyway, as they must be served by a Sheriff.

Not signing for mail is not an "admission of guilt" and please, let's not insert our own personal opinion. Everyone is entitled to due process under the law and everyone is presumed innocent until proven otherwise.

Not signing for certified mail is not a crime, and the person who refuses to sign may have their own reasons for not doing so. It's irresponsible to guess, or assume why people choose not to sign for the mail they receive certified.

Attorneys do not send pleadings via certified mail. They must file pleadings with the courts. Copies are mailed to both plaintiffs and defendants, but if both have their own attorney, the copy would be mailed to them (the attorneys).
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Old Feb 22nd, 2010, 01:23 PM   #14
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Default Re: Certified mail... If I do not sign for it from an attorney

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Don't the courts send jury summons by regular mail?
Ours do. I am in Arizona.

Just regular mail.


But just to clarify, the poster here was asking about a letter from an attorney.
Clearly that does not need to be signed for and accepted. Nor does any registered mail I agree. You may miss something important for you--or not--but you are not required to sign.
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Old Feb 22nd, 2010, 02:12 PM   #15
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Default Re: Certified mail... If I do not sign for it from an attorney

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Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
Not sure what the last post meant exactly, but a person is under no obligation to sign for a certified letter, regardless of who it is from. There is no law currently in existence that requires a recipient of a certified letter to sign for it. After three attempts, the mail is returned, unsigned for.

No certified mail would contain any type of court documents anyway, as they must be served by a Sheriff.

Not signing for mail is not an "admission of guilt" and please, let's not insert our own personal opinion. Everyone is entitled to due process under the law and everyone is presumed innocent until proven otherwise.

Not signing for certified mail is not a crime, and the person who refuses to sign may have their own reasons for not doing so. It's irresponsible to guess, or assume why people choose not to sign for the mail they receive certified.

Attorneys do not send pleadings via certified mail. They must file pleadings with the courts. Copies are mailed to both plaintiffs and defendants, but if both have their own attorney, the copy would be mailed to them (the attorneys).

Good answer!
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Old Feb 25th, 2010, 10:21 PM   #16
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Default Re: Certified mail... If I do not sign for it from an attorney

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Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
Not sure what the last post meant exactly, but a person is under no obligation to sign for a certified letter, regardless of who it is from. There is no law currently in existence that requires a recipient of a certified letter to sign for it. After three attempts, the mail is returned, unsigned for.

R. I agree that no one is under a obligation to sign for a certified letter.

No certified mail would contain any type of court documents anyway, as they must be served by a Sheriff.

R. Most court filings, court documents, orders are served by regular U.S. Mail.

Not signing for mail is not an "admission of guilt" and please, let's not insert our own personal opinion. Everyone is entitled to due process under the law and everyone is presumed innocent until proven otherwise.

R. I think the poster meant to say its a "Admission of Evasiveness" not accepting certified mail, and I would agree with that. Most people know why a certified letter is being sent. Someone wants to certify you received the letter, significant enough to pay a fee to get your John Doe on it.

Not signing for certified mail is not a crime, and the person who refuses to sign may have their own reasons for not doing so. It's irresponsible to guess, or assume why people choose not to sign for the mail they receive certified.

R. It is not a crime. But because they want to avoid/evade signing for it=surreptious evasive behavior. Thats what the other poster was conveying. People feel it is something important that they don't want to see. They can call the post office and ask who sent it when they get the notice to pick it up, and figure out whether they want to pick it up or not. They make a knowing decision whether to pick it up or not.

How do you explain to a Judge why you failed to pick up your mail despite 3 notices to do so?, and keep your credibility intact with the Judge?

Attorneys do not send pleadings via certified mail. They must file pleadings with the courts. Copies are mailed to both plaintiffs and defendants, but if both have their own attorney, the copy would be mailed to them (the attorneys).
R. I agree with this paragraph, regular mail is the norm. Unless serving pleadings, subpoenas, etc.
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Old Apr 23rd, 2010, 09:13 AM   #17
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Default Re: Certified mail... If I do not sign for it from an attorney

I'm not sure if you have any obligation to sign for certified letters, but court papers (summonses and subpoenas) CAN be served by registered mail.
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Old Feb 20th, 2013, 07:45 PM   #18
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Default Re: Certified mail... If I do not sign for it from an attorney

I don't know if it is different for different states but I was just involved in a boundary line dispute case and although the first summons was served by a process server after a month of trying and defendant refusing to admit who they were, the court itself sent a copy of the first and second judgments, liability and damages to the defendants who did not answer or show up for either hearing, and the clerk of the court told me that not accepting a certified letter is not a crime, but it is also not a defense. You cannot use not signing or receiving any mail that is correctly addressed to your known current address as a defense in court.
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