Proper use of "Esq."

This is a discussion on Proper use of "Esq." within the Attorneys & Legal Ethics forum, part of the ATTORNEYS, COURTS, LITIGATION category; This is not exactly an ethics question, but ... Is the use of the legal title "Esq." proper for both ...

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Old Jan 22nd, 2008, 12:33 PM   #1
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Confused Proper use of "Esq."

This is not exactly an ethics question, but ...

Is the use of the legal title "Esq." proper for both male and female attorneys ?

Thanks.
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Old Jan 23rd, 2008, 11:26 AM   #2
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Default Re: Proper use of "Esq."

either...

2. Abbr. Esq. Used as an honorific usually in its abbreviated form, especially after the name of an attorney or a consular officer: Jane Doe, Esq.; John Doe, Esq.
3. In medieval times, a candidate for knighthood who served a knight as an attendant and a shield bearer.
4. Archaic An English country gentleman; a squire.
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Old Mar 24th, 2008, 08:38 AM   #3
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Default Re: Proper use of "Esq."

Both males and females can use the term Esq. today. It is commonly used for attorneys to show that one is licensed to practice law. You can use "J.D." after your name after you graduate from law school and then "Esq." after you pass the bar. It is like "Dr." for people who have "M.D." degrees.
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Old Oct 11th, 2008, 06:17 PM   #4
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Default Re: Proper use of "Esq."

DISTRIBUTION

It strikes me that learned counsel lacks the due diligence, attention to detail and capability to research "Esq". As a mere mortal and average citizen I applaud the constitutions prohibition (see Titles of Nobility Amendment and as detailed in Article 1. Section 8 of the Constitution of The United States. Further, the source document states).

"No Title of Nobility shall be granted by the United States: And no Person holding any Office of Profit or Trust under them, shall, without the Consent of the Congress, accept of any present, Emolument, Office, or Title, of any kind whatever, from any King, Prince or foreign State."

I just tell my staff not to hire any attorney that uses the "Esq" as it says the wrong thing about the individual. If they know what it means, then I don't want their services and if they don't know, well then they should and they haven't done their homework.

Have a nice day. :-)

Last edited by top_admin; Oct 11th, 2008 at 11:46 PM. Reason: link approved
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Old Oct 12th, 2008, 03:21 PM   #5
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Default Re: Proper use of "Esq."

Esq is commonly used and widely accepted.

Has nothing to do with nobility.

But hey do as you wish.
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Old Feb 24th, 2009, 08:25 AM   #6
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Angry Re: Proper use of "Esq."

What a load of pretentious codswallop. Esq., is most definitely a British title of nobility, which has been simply 'assumed' by American solicitors.

It is a complete pretention for an American to assume this title, and to somehow look down their noses at for instance a British Esquire who is using it in its correct context, since it has been most likely granted to him by his monarch.

I hold a J.D. but more interestingly by ancestry I am entitled to be addressed as the "Much Honored so & so of such a place." In the UK I might well receive a letter from the Palace calling me J. Bloggs, Esq., that title would of course have nothing to do with my qualification. It is quite ludicrous for Americans to have simply 'assumed' this title as their own and to suddenly expect the British to amend their historical and heraldic customs which date to the Norman Conquests.
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Old Feb 24th, 2009, 08:27 AM   #7
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Angry Re: Proper use of "Esq."

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
Esq is commonly used and widely accepted.

Has nothing to do with nobility.

But hey do as you wish.
Quite wrong!
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Old Feb 24th, 2009, 08:31 AM   #8
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Default Re: Proper use of "Esq."

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
This is not exactly an ethics question, but ...

Is the use of the legal title "Esq." proper for both male and female attorneys ?

Thanks.

Technically no. Some US females wrongly assume this title, but it is a male title of British origin, which is to do with gentry and not occupation.
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Old Mar 10th, 2009, 02:25 PM   #9
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Default Re: Proper use of "Esq."

It's interesting that the legislative bodies that make the laws are predominately lawyers. The laws of an individual state dictate what indications particular professions may use, such as "M.D." for a doctor, "D.D.S" for a dentist, or "P.E." for professional engineeer. However, these lawyer filled legislative bodies haven't seen fit to establish the appropriate honorific for themselves.
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Old Sep 13th, 2009, 10:20 PM   #10
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Cool Re: Proper use of "Esq."

In researching the proper title to be used in corresponding with practicing attorneys-at-law, I came across this dribble. The discussion clearly reflects why the class of attorneys in the USA is considered to be pompous and self-serving. What a lot of crap!

“First thing we do, let’s kill all the lawyers.” [Shakespeare, King Henry VI, Part II, IV, ii] would probably not result in chaos as is the general interpretation but in a sense of freedom the world has not known for quite some time. Global warming and the financial crises would end, too, once the lawyers shut up and stopped manipulating society.

Cheers!
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